Culture Making is now archived. Enjoy five years of reflections on culture worth celebrating.
For more about the book and Andy Crouch, please visit andy-crouch.com.

Posts tagged photography

photo
"Skate Land" (2003), by Christian Patterson, from the portfolio series Sound Affects 2002–2005 :: via BOOOOOOOM!
Nate:
photo
from "Desert Reality," photos by by Ed Freeman, opening in New York on 10 December 2009 :: via We can shoot too
Nate:

from “Two Weeks in Forever,” by Peter van Agtmael, New York Times, 14 October 2009

Christy:
photo
"Wedding Preparations, Davao City, Philippines," photo by Ryan Anson, The New Breed of Documentary Photographers, 2 October 2009
Nate:
photo Food flags
photo
"Lebanon (lavash, fattoush, and a herb sprig)," by WHYBIN for the Sydney International Food Festival 2009, blogged at The Kitchn, 29 September 2009 :: via GOOD
Nate:
photo
"Woman taking her time rambling south at 63 mph on the Hollywood Freeway near the Vine Street exit in Los Angeles on a Saturday afternoon in 1991," from the series Vector Portraits, by Andrew Bush, at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles, 12 September–15 October :: via We can shoot too
Nate:
photo
"It's Too Damn Hot for This !!!," a light test for a BusinessWeek photo shoot, photo by Brad Trent of his assistant Kaz Sakuma, on a roof in the South Bronx, light-test.com, 18 August 2009 :: via kottke.org
Nate:
photo
"Boston Road near Charlotte Street" (1979) from Faces in the Rubble" by David Gonzalez, The New York Times, 21 August 2009
Christy:
photo
"Crazymouse," Minnesota State Fair (2008), photo by David Bowman :: via Flak Photo
Nate:
photo
from "Light breakfast," photo by David Sykes, 18 June 2009 :: via swissmiss
Nate:
excerpt Face time
Nate:

When Dr. Yehonatan N. Turner began his residency in radiology, he was frustrated that the CT scans he analyzed revealed nothing about the patients behind them — only their internal organs. So to make things personal, he imagined each patient was his father.

But then he had a better idea: attach a photograph of the actual patient to each file.

“I was looking for a way to make each case feel unique and less abstract,” said Dr. Turner, 36, now a third-year resident at Shaare Zedek Medical Center here. “I thought having a photo of the patient would help me relate in a deeper way.”

Dr. Turner’s hunch turned into an unusual medical study. Its preliminary findings, presented in Chicago last December at a conference of the Radiological Society of North America, suggested that when a digital photograph was attached to a patient’s file, radiologists provided longer, more meticulous reports. And they said they felt more connected to the patients, whom they seldom meet face to face.

photo
"Monks from the Shaolin Temple in China rehearse inside wooden boxes as part of a dance entitled "Sutra" choreographed by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui - part of the annual Singapore Arts Festival, Wednesday 20 May 2009" AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, The Big Picture, 19 June 2009
Nate:
photo
"Sunna & Laila," from Sámi, The People photographs by Erika Larsen, women in photography, 16 July 2009
Nate:
photo
Astoria Pool, Astoria, Queens, New York, by Angie Smith, 2005 :: via Flak Photo, 14 April 2009
Nate:
photo
"Sáo Paulo, Brazil," photograph by Carlos Cazalis, The New Breed of Documentary Photographers, 15 May 2009
Nate:
photo
image from Case study homes, 2008, by Peter Bialobrzeski, L.A. Galerie, Frankfurt, Germany, 27 March–23 May 2009 :: via Boing Boing
Nate:
Nate:
"Life Through the Viewfinder," a post by blogger mrs tulip, 6 April 2009 :: via Tomorrow Museum

Two schools I have taught at in the past couple of years ban camera use at their high school musical night. One of the reasons is because students look out to the audience to see if mum and dad are watching. If they see only a sea of lenses instead of adoring eyes they are met with technology rather than soul.

We are obsessed with recording life from our point of view, even when it is only 30 cm from the next person's POV.

The Mona Lisa is photographed by every visitor to the Lourve when we have ready access to pristine images of her taken in optimum lighting etc.

We humans are strange creatures.

Nate:
image

It’s not often that aesthetics are considered in the study of science, but [University of Chicago grad student Elizabeth] Kessler maintains it is necessary if one is to fully understand the space telescope and its impact.

“There’s a lot of translation that occurs between the data the Hubble collects and the final images that are shared with the public,” Kessler explains. Translating raw data into the “pretty pictures” that have become a staple of newspaper front pages requires careful image processing.

Astronomers and image specialists strive for realistic representations of the cosmos, yet they make subjective choices regarding contrast, composition and color. The Hubble images are complex representations of the cosmos that balance both art and science. In that sense, as well as in their appearance and emotional impact, Kessler says they resemble 19th century Romantic landscape paintings, especially those of the American West.

“The aesthetic choices made result in a sense of majesty and wonder about nature and how spectacular it can be, just as the paintings of the American West did,” Kessler said. “The Hubble images are part of the Romantic landscape tradition. They fit that popular, familiar model of what the natural world should look like.”

photo
"S C Road, Gandhinagar" [map], photo by SloganMurugan, Which Main? What Cross?, 22 March 2009
Nate:
photo
"Jesus," Orlando, Florida, 2008, from the series Holy Land, by Lee Satkowski :: via Flak Photo
Nate: